• Randy

Why does citizenship matter?

In Federalist 42, Madison recognized previous faults in the Articles of Confederation, failing to address a uniform system of naturalization. He States:

"By the laws of several States, certain descriptions of aliens, who had rendered themselves obnoxious, were laid under interdict and inconsistent not only with the rights of citizenship but with the privilege of residence. What would have been the consequence, if such persons, by residence or otherwise, had acquired the character of citizenship under the laws of another state, and then asserted their rights as such, both to the residence and citizenship, within the state prescribing them? Whatever the legal consequences might have been, other consequences would probably have resulted, of too serious and nature not to be provided against."

Just this simple passage demonstrates the importance placed on the identity of our being a citizen, vs “Alien” and the impact of no standardization of a “United” States under the same privileges. How then, can a city council and mayor, constructed under the laws and authority of a state, for example, Tucson, believe they have a legal right to declare themselves exempt of the laws that regulate and establish their very existence? How can they violate the promise and contract to the people to uphold these laws? Do “citizens” granted citizenship under established laws and in a small section of a state take upon themselves decisions that affect those outside the boundaries of their community and impose those consequences on the rest?

Isn’t this living in chaos and lawlessness? Is it right for our legislature to speak for all of us and say “Well, we have to see what happens” when we already know the answer?

Why has this even gotten to this point? Where have we failed as a society? We haven’t educated our youth properly.


12 views

JOIN THE CONVERSATION: 

Paid for by Randy Miller for Arizona